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Analytical Reasoning - Selection
Reasoning
Contents
Analytical Reasoning
Selection
Allocation
Connection

Selection

The common thread uniting all analytical reasoning selection problems is that the set of conditions will provide the examinee with a group of "players" out of which a smaller group must be selected. Like all of the analytical reasoning problems, the topics utilized in these selection problems can run the gamut.

Another important feature for examinees to understand when addressing an analytical reasoning selection problem is that a careful initial reading of the set of conditions is critical. Like all analytical reasoning problems, selection problems will provide the examinee with a list of players and certain facts or criteria unique to each player. Along with this introduction, the parameters of the problem will be introduced. For example, the problem may read like this:

Boss must select three managers to attend the seminar.

Analytical reasoning selection problems will require the examinee to answer one or more of the following questions:

  1. Identify the players that must be selected based on the criteria/facts provided;
  2. Identify the players that are eligible for selection based on the criteria/facts provided;
  3. Identify the players that are ineligible for selection based on the criteria/facts provided;
  4. Assuming some specific player or players are selected, identify the players that must be selected;
  5. Assuming some specific player or players are selected, identify the players that cannot be selected;
  6. Given certain facts, identify the number of players eligible for selection.

Having established the background for analytical reasoning selection problems, consider the following example:

There are five friends that all live in the same neighborhood. Their names are Amy, Betty, Cathy, Dora, and Eve. Five parties are planned in the neighborhood for the coming season which all of the aforementioned friends can attend, subject to the following restrictions:

If Amy attends a party, then Dora cannot attend that party.
If Betty attends a party, then either Cathy or Dora, but not both, attends that party.
If Cathy attends a party, then Eva does not attend that party.
If Eva attends a party, then either Amy or Betty, but not both, attends that party.

It is easy to see that the examinee is bombarded with a glut of information right from the start in analytical reasoning selection problems. Most authorities agree that the key to addressing these problems is to actively read the set of conditions and determine the various relationships. Depending on what works best for the examinee, it may prove helpful to draw out certain pictures that denote players that are restricted from being together, forced to be together, or can be together. This may assist the examinee to speedily tackle typical questions that flow from the set of conditions. For example, utilizing the set of conditions above, consider this question:

If Dora attends one of the parties, then which one of the following could be a complete and accurate list of the other friends who could also attend that party?

Without having established some method of memorializing the various restrictions provided in the set of conditions, the examinee may find that they must revisit the set of conditions and waste precious time.



 

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